Review of “Drew and the Floating Labyrinth”

Disclaimer: I am the developer of this game. Which makes it a conflict of interest that I would write a review. But given a lack of written scored reviews elsewhere, I felt it best to write something to make sure people know what they would be getting into should they buy the game. It also acts as a release for me, a psychological exercise after releasing my first game. In the meantime, there are a variety of preview posts and playthrough videos online that I encourage you to check out.

A variety of puzzle types in this platformer, all not too challenging.

A variety of puzzle types in this platformer, all not too challenging.

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What is #gamergate?

What exactly is #gamergate?

Not Gamersgate.com, the PC game digital store and competitor to Steam. The hashtag that’s been trending on Twitter and the internet for a couple months.

Well, as a indie developer, I’m still not exactly sure, but I tried to look it up. I looked up a few random youtube videos about it (which I post here), and encourage you to do your own research and make your own opinions.

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PAX PRIME 2014: A review and afterthought from a indie developer

I went to PAX PRIME 2014 in Seattle, Washington about two weeks ago to show off my small indie game “Drew and the Floating Labyrinth.”

About “Drew and the Floating Labyrinth:”

“Drew and the Floating Labyrinth” is a hand-drawn 3d puzzle platformer. The fact that it IS hand-drawn, not using cel-shading or any other fancy renderer, but stillĀ in a 3d game, makes it unique, and is one of it’s highest selling points. It follows Drew in a mysterious, barren and simplistic environment, made up of invisible levels that require you to look for clues of safety before you simply walk or jump. Therefore, the gameplay mechanics are very different to typical platformers and also a point of interest. Throw in great music and voice acting (not provided by me, and hence why I can confidently say they are actually good), and you have my first complete independent game that I am actually proud of (past attempts were barely fit to be called student projects). And I wanted the world to see it, not to sell well, but to show that traditional animation still had a place in media by putting it somewhere they wouldn’t expect for something new.

Have you seen a hand-drawn character in a 3d game before?

Have you seen a hand-drawn character in a 3d game before?

Wait… how did YOU of all people get a booth at PAX PRIME?

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Tutorial: How to make 2D Traditional Animation in a 3D Game

I forgot to mention it here, but I posted a video tutorial some weeks ago about how exactly I make 2d animation in 3d games, such as in “Drew and the Floating Labyrinth.”

I didn’t think this tutorial was necessary, but some people have asked for one, so I planned to make one for some time now. Sorry it took so long.

Also, I apologize for my quiet and stammering voice, I never was a good public speaker.

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To The Internet…

Over the last several weeks, we’ve heard of independent game developers getting hacked or harassed unfairly by people online. We’ve seen celebrities hacked and their privacy exposed.

When I first read about one of the developer’s that was hacked, I saw some articles with comments of pity and disgust of the Internet, and some articles that said “he deserved it.”

The problem is that when you post something online, be it a picture, video or post, it immediately becomes subject to review by the world, and to anyone who actually cares. And in today’s world, EVERYTHING is online, be it your photos or your television-watching habits. Nothing is sacred anymore. And if anyone actually cares who you are, they will comment.

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